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The Edible Torah

 

Posts Tagged ‘shabbat’

Nitzavim (Deuteronomy 29:9 – 30:20)

Courtesy of Julie Seltzer and MyJewishLearning.com

Our Torah cycle and our year is drawing to a close, and like many people in the twilight of a cycle of time (whether it’s a year, a life or tv series), Moses reflects on a happier time, a time when the world was full of possibilities. Back to Mt. Sinai we go, when we received the 10 commandments and for one amazing moment everyone heard the voice of God. At that moment, we offered our children as guarentors of our covenant.

Then Moses realizes where the Israelites are now, and foretells of sadness, rebellion and retribution. (A modern analogy would be when we watched Fonzi jump the shark and realized it was truly all over.). Moses pleads with the Israelites not to forget the covenant, even as he knows what will surely follow.

So, limited only by your creativity and the category of food which you have been assigned, please bring a food which comes with a guarentee.


Not sure what this Torah portion is about? You can find a brief summary in The Edible Torah’s “Condensed Guide to the Weekly Torah Readings”. For more information on what The Edible Torah is all about, along with insight on how to set up a pot-luck Shabbat experience, check out “The Edible Torah”.

Ki Tavo(Deuteronomy 26:1 – 29:8)

Courtesy of Julie Seltzer and MyJewishLearning.com


In subtle support of the month of Elul in which we read this portion, Torah offers thoughts which allow for self-reflection, corrective action, and a return to our roots.

Moses gives instructions how the Israelites should mark our entrance to the Land, how offerings and tithes are meant to support not just the religious framework of society (the Levites) but also the disadvantaged. The tribes go up opposing mountains and listen to Moses recite blessings and curses, to which they respond "Amen!". Finally, Moses underscores all the laws (from the last 3 portions at least) with the reminder of the miracles and wonders everyone had seen and experienced since Egypt, and a hint of what was to come in the new Land.

However, the inspiration for our theme this week comes from the very beginning. Ki Tavo begins this week with the words:

"When you enter the land that the Lord your God is giving you as a heritage, and you possess it and settle in it, you shall take some of every first fruit of the soil, which you harvest from the land that the Lord your God is giving you, put it in a basket and go to the place where the Lord your God will choose to establish His name." (26:1-2)

SO… limited only by your creativity and the category of food assigned, please bring a "fruity" food.


Not sure what this Torah portion is about? You can find a brief summary in The Edible Torah’s “Condensed Guide to the Weekly Torah Readings”. For more information on what The Edible Torah is all about, along with insight on how to set up a pot-luck Shabbat experience, check out “The Edible Torah”.

Ki Teitzei (Deuteronomy 21:10 – 25:19)

Courtesy of Julie Seltzer and MyJewishLearning.com

This week Moses continues his detailing of the laws, and one caught my eye this year:

(21:15-17) If a man has two wives, one loved and the other unloved, and both the loved and the unloved have borne him sons, but the first-born is the son of the unloved one — when he wills his property to his sons, he may not treat as first-born the son of the loved one in disregard of the son of the unloved one who is older. Instead, he must accept the first-born, the son of the unloved one, and allot to him a double portion of all he possesses; since he is the first fruit of his vigor, the birthright is his due.

Clearly Moses wasn’t paying attention during Bereshit/Genesis!

…Or was he?

In thinking about this, what if the intention of this law, which so clearly goes against what our own Patriarchs and Matriarchs did, was a way of ensuring it never happened again? What if the point is "Abraham, Sarah, and the rest were righteous beyond measure – so much that we ask for God’s grace in their name. And even THEY screwed this up. So there really outta be a law, to keep our sorry butts in line."

SO… limited only by your creativity and the category of food assigned, please bring a food which reflects a way in which you learned from a past mistake.


Not sure what this Torah portion is about? You can find a brief summary in The Edible Torah’s “Condensed Guide to the Weekly Torah Readings”. For more information on what The Edible Torah is all about, along with insight on how to set up a pot-luck Shabbat experience, check out “The Edible Torah”.

Shoftim (Deuteronomy 16:18 – 21:9)

Courtesy of Julie Seltzer and MyJewishLearning.com

Parsha Shoftim deals a lot with the idea of equity, fairness, equality, and keeping Israelite society on an equal footing. It talks about how a king (should the Israelites choose one in the future) should behave and be guided; how to set up a court of law; how to deal with unsolved murders (this was before the days of "CSI: Jerusalem"); and more.

Most notable in this portion is the phrase "Tzedek, tzekek tirdof" (Justice, Justice shall you pursue – 16:20). To understand that comment in context, the full phrase is:

16:18 You shall appoint magistrates and officials for your tribes, in all the settlements that the Lord your God is giving you, and they shall govern the people with due justice. 19 You shall not judge unfairly: you shall show no partiality; you shall not take bribes, for bribes blind the eyes of the discerning and upset the plea of the just. 20 Justice, justice shall you pursue, that you may thrive and occupy the land that the Lord your God is giving you.

SO… limited only by your creativity and the category of food assigned, please bring a "judged food".


Not sure what this Torah portion is about? You can find a brief summary in The Edible Torah’s “Condensed Guide to the Weekly Torah Readings”. For more information on what The Edible Torah is all about, along with insight on how to set up a pot-luck Shabbat experience, check out “The Edible Torah”.

Re’eh (Deuteronomy 11:26 – 16:17)

Courtesy of Julie Seltzer and MyJewishLearning.com

In parashat Re’eh, we get back down to the nitty-gritty of Jewish life. Some of the key points this week are the commandment not consuming blood (stated twice for emphasis), to destroy the idols and worship places when entering Canaan, the need to gather 3 times a year (Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot), and to avoid false prophets.

It could be interpreted that the central theme in all of this is doing that which keeps us close as a community and culture, and removing things that would pull us apart and/or away from Judaism.

So, limited only by your creativity and the category of food which you have been assigned, please bring a food which could lead you astray.


Not sure what this Torah portion is about? You can find a brief summary in The Edible Torah’s “Condensed Guide to the Weekly Torah Readings”. For more information on what The Edible Torah is all about, along with insight on how to set up a pot-luck Shabbat experience, check out “The Edible Torah”.