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OmerChallenge: Day 49

Today is forty-nine days which are seven weeks in the Omer.
Hayom tish’ah v-arba’im yom shehaym shiv’ah shavuot la-omer.

What is you best memory from second seder, when the Omer began?

Seder Plate
Creative Commons License photo credit: revenante

One of the quotes from seder sticks with me:

Standing on the parted shores of history
we still believe what we were taught
before ever we stood at Sinai’s foot;

that wherever we go, it is eternally Egypt
that there is a better place, a promised land;
that the winding way to that promise passes through the wilderness

that there is no way to get from here to there
except by joining hands, marching
together.
(—adapted from Michael Welzer)

I’m reminded of walking home that night, a combination of giddy, bemused, strung-out and invigorated as my wife and kids and I held hands at 3am, making our way back to a house we barely recognized in the dark.

I remember collapsing into bed, wondering if “this is what it’s going to be like”.

What did I mean, in those last pre-sleep thoughts? What “this” was I referring to: Late? Energizing? Bewildering? Which “it”: – Passover? Seders? Life  in general?

And here, over a month later, what do I mean now?

On this, the last day of the longest Omer of my life, I can look back and see that I have moved – I see footprints trailing behind me in the sand of the wilderness. I am definitely not the person I was, although neither have I gotten “there” yet by any stretch of the imagination.

Like the famous quote from beside the burning bush, “I am who I am becoming”

 

Standing on the parted shores of history

we still believe what we were taught

before ever we stood at Sinai’s foot;

 

that wherever we go, it is eternally Egypt

that there is a better place, a promised land;

that the winding way to that promise passes through the wilderness

 

that there is no way to get from here to there

except by joining hands, marching

together.

(—adapted from Michael Welzer)

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